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is a hearing and resolution and "deja vu all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i want to thank the civil grand jury report for looking at this topic. i decided to bring with me today these folders. these folders represent all of the documents i have been looking at in the last couple of years on this specific topic and in particular let me just title a couple of the reports i have on this. from 2002 from the former executive director from dits, which is the predecessor agency to the department of technology and proposal for management and resources. then go a couple years later the civil grand jury report looked at our technology with hospital "pot holes or possibilities" and a year later the city controller had a letter and said they needed to improve service and performance measures. after that our city analyst did a management audit into their practices and two years later a
president chiu. >> thank you. i want to thank you for your work you have done at department of technology and tough economic times and the fact of the matter is your department has been subjected to the lion's share of budget cuts we were forced to do and not asking departments to make similar cuts in their it situation and i think that is part of the tension and why we shouldn't know been able to make headway. you allude to the fact until you get direction from the top about need of centralization you had to form partnerships and you as the head of department of technology can't tell other heads to cooperate and you have to work out and partnership. one of the things that i wished the grand jury spent more time on. this is the trend we're seeing in agencies and governments around the country. by in large most governments have a growing decentralization and we know we're not doing that for everything but there are functions that need to be decentralized and we know there are successes here in california and the state is expected to save $3 billion. denver went through a great consolida
and department of technology to work with this on the budget analyst or controller. for finding four and appoint two members without delay. from my understanding will be implemented and while the city has not moved on it for six months i expect this to be. >> >> six years i expect the city to work on this and get it done in the next six months or six weeks. next is have a plan and budget and reviewed by coit and to the mayor's office and the board of supervisors. again what is fascinating about the answers and all of the agencies are across the map. some say yes. some say no. some say it's implemented. some say it's not. it will be implemented and always a cit budget but not decisions related to that budget. recommendation number six. subject to coit approval of the i kr.d t budget and staffing plans coit and the cio must monitor adherence to these plans and i think what i will say for this should be implemented within the next six months. one of the challenges we face challenges here at the board and coit and time lines and budgets keep slipping and it's important to have monitoring
and technology within san francisco government. perhaps we have to wait for a different administration for there to be a fair hearing on ways to improve technology. perhaps you, the board of supervisors, can take up this challenge. we hope you will. there was a better ending to our title report, deja vu all over again. that is "where there is a will there is a way .". thank you. >> thank you for the time and effort put into that report. any questions right now president chiu. all right. with that i would like to ask the mayor's office to come up. cindy is here representing the mayor's team with some responses and perhaps follow up questions. >> good afternoon supervisors. i am cindy, deputy director of the marrow's budget office and here to speak to the reports. i am going to keep my response fairly brief and will answer any questions you have in the hearing. as you know ie.d t and innovation are among the mayor's top priority and shares in the task force and focusing on government efficiency, effectiveness and responsiveness through innovation and it. since he's been in office he
technology. it is a great way to make one of something, which is good. perhaps you want something that is custom just for you and you don't want something mass-produced. right now the ones you buy at home, it is qaeda militants and that sort of squeeze it out. there are other ways, there are liquid resins and powders and etc. you can go to a website and you can -- they have more expensive printers and you can get things printed in titanium. stainless steel. the quality is astounding. ge 3-d prints turbine blades for jet engines. there are some limits as to what you can do with the a 3-d printer, but not many. the question is simply how long is it going to take? it took 15 years to get from a dot matrix printer where we are now. so how long it will take for the photo-quality because i don't think it's going to be 15 years. in part because it shares the same mechanical technologies. but the interesting stuff gets into materials. right now, we can be one color and plastic. the next one, we will do two colors and plastic advocates better resolution than the maximum we will be three an
overcome these, but the whole family suffers. >> it's the technology that's set to transform the manufacturing industry. press control p and get lots of print on paper, but the pen, too. >> i think eventually it will completely transform the way products are made. >> hello. new york, the city that never sleeps. a good reason to stay awake. superstorm seaped shut down the subway system and stock exchange and the presidential election campaigning. it has been a shock to a country built on a belief in man's destiny to create a better world, but there are limits. mark was in the united states to see the devastation firsthand. >> welcome to hoboken, a poor city on the new jersey side of the hudson. places like this felt the worst of it and by the time we got there the water had already fallen by four feet. on the heights above power lines had been brought down across the street, bringing life to a halt. >> nobody was ready for this. this has never happened before, ever. i mean, it was devastating. all over. i have a house down the jersey shore that's underwater, they tell me. >> i
and technology. i was think of projects we could do together. i started a site called geek dad, projects on for you and for the kid. i feel constantly at getting them interested. perhaps because i'm trying so hard. one weekend, one friday at the office we got two boxes they came in in the first was a lego kit that was really cool. the go with sensors like a robot, really good and the other box was a remote control airplane. sunday will fly a plane in the park. this would be the best weekend ever. you can sort of see where this is going. saturday we dutifully put together the robot, this little three wheeled tripod and, you know, you put it together and program. a programming language i thought the kids would love it and we finally get it ready to push the button and it goes forward until it hits the wall and accept. the kids are like, you're kidding. i seen transformers. that's not a robot. i'm like okay, i've ruined robotics for children. i get it, we would have tomorrow. so go to the park tomorrow and fly a plane. go to the park and that goes right into a tree. and a worst part was whe
the line. as we get to our military partners i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the new
new technology making breast cancer detection more accurate and giving patients peace of mind. a two- time breast cancer survivor inter family turning her medical setbacks into an opportunity to help others. >> in tonight's medical watch taking radiologists eyes into deeper territory new technology boost two dimensional images into 3 d giving doctors a clearer view and patients more peace of mind. the traditional mammogram has been the gold standard because it's very good at detecting calcifications of the early stages of cancer. and can spot not jewels that a woman may not feel oneself exams, but still some patients pose a challenge to radiologists, and there is extra tissue a lesion could easily be hiding in there. like repairs this radiologist relies on conventional digital images which provide a simple projection at a single depth and now she is wearing in a new technology, three d sentencesdimensional tomo synthesis. in a single swoop on the arm of the machine captures not one but multiple pitcher's at varying depths next computer software stacks the images each in a 1 mm slice
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
to affect major changes. >> what good reason is there for not embracing the best of what digital technology offers? i understand people get set in their ways, but we are talking about saving lives and cutting costs. i cannot imagine what the push by would be. the fax i get frustrated because i have seen what happens. -- >> i get frustrated because i have seen what happens. i said, how am i going to get this into reality? basically this is an appeal to consumers, to the public. what we need is this gutenberg moment in medicine. now people can read, because this is on your phone, and there is no reason why most people who can easily get up to speed will drive and no medicine. there are not enough physicians, and the establishment is too rigid to except these profound changes. >> as the patient have any role, any agency he or she can use to drive the future of medicine? tracks let's say you have high blood pressure, which almost 70 million americans have. you can track that better than ever before. it all you have to do is press start, and you are taking charge of an important diagnostic, and
is it to drain seawater from 20 miles of subway tunnels? throw a few shamwow's down there. we have the technology! god, please. don't make me go on that bus with those people again. they wore denim, everywhere. (laughter) now folks, if you watched this show you know i don't like to jump to conclusions. i make conclusions come to me. this is tip of the hat, wag of the finger. (cheers and applause) nation, there is nothing i love more than taking pictures with my iphone. it is so convenient. when i was a kid we had to duct tape a polaroid camera to our rotary phone. bonus t held 20 songs if you also hot glued a record player to it. and the best part about this little technological marvel is that it allows me to document my life wrefer i go from concerts to family gatherings, to spontaneous eruptions of applause for from my studio audience. (cheers and applause) how lucky i have this thing. sadly, even with my iphone there are still memorable moments that i miss. well, a swedish company has created a new device that will solve that problem. >> sometimes the best moments in life are the simple ones s
can't have the boom and the bust. thenwhere it went big and then it was destroyed and then technology jobs went overseas. it's difficult to think about that and the repercussion when we could have a much more orderly transfer. but not the boom and bust. >> gavin: assume that president obama is re-elected. what should he think about going into the new year, taking the baton of sandy and new consciousness that hopefully is iowaawakened. what should be the top priority going into the second term? >> the top priority is talking again. your point was i think it was a good one that you started out with, no one is talking about. neither candidate is talking about it. we can't expect the american public to get on board if the leaders aren't talking about this. one thing that everyone is clear on, we will have storms of more intensity because of global warming. we will have more storms like this in the future because of global warming. one thing we have to do is start talking about it. second we really double down on theonthe innovation agenda. the president did a good job speaking about the s
technology is dying out all together. as always with great change comes great opportunity. digital technology has the capity bri neorms of reading and new modes of publication. but to understand what the future of the book might look like t helps to appreciate some of its past. >> the manuscript library was built in 1963. its white all was ter shell has no windows this is to protect the treasures within. we're joined by david who is currently writing his own history of the book. >> books aren't going away. i mean i think and the question is what role they will play seems to me its thing that is hard toast pdict. one of the things that is really remarkable is as europe made the transition from world dominated by manuscript and manuscript proud the text that were bound into books, and by the end of the 15th century the print technology takes root. you find lots of people saying oh this print technology, it's very interesting. it's very efficient but everyone has access to everything, there are no controls. one doesn't really know if this thing has any real authority. the vocabulary in which an
to intro daus a lot of technology to help with the interoperatability of the civil military exercise. one of the main goals that we had for this was to allow our military a crisis response adaptive force package and opportunity to allow their training and certification in providing the most appropriate military expeditionary force for that scenario. one of the things that we realize in the military when we do these exercises in a foreign humanitarian response, that a lot of our military capabilities are not just for overseas foreign disasters but it also allows the military to be trained and certified to respond to local domestic disaster situations as well. i had mentioned that we had 22 nations participating in rimpac and this slide is a representation of the military and civilian partners that we had participating in this event. and we had many, many international partners and we had a lot of domestic partners: medical and military editionary partners as well. okay, this is our command and control slide. we took a lot of care to get this right. we wanted to make sure that we portra
practice. muni -- okay. f7. muni fails to fully implement technological improvements. muni says -- they give us a list -- muni gave us a list of improvements that are under way. they say these will reduce the need for switchbacks. the jury answers, "the jury appreciates the efforts being made. we are glad some of these are partially accomplished and others coming in the future. many systems we interviewed had these technologys in place. we would like muni to have a sense of urgency about the improvements and concerned about the term "under way" and completion dates that are years away" . on f8 which concerns a new control center lacking adequate operating personnel and f9 muni has failed to conduct and publish rider survey and muni agreed with both of these findings. as far as the recommendations, the first recommendation is to eliminate switchbacks except when unavoidable. muni disagrees with the recommendation reasserting that switch backs are valid and necessary given the operating environment. they have worked on reducing the switchbacks and keeping the public informe
to the need for more science, technology, engineering, and math education in the country. >> the challenge is issued every year to students and teachers. they're going after recognition and prizes like computer equipment. >> today, you know, you're still working on your game. you have, essentially, until thursday. >> for some students, the competition is an eye-opening experience. >> before this challenge, i didn't really like math or science. i thought they were kind of boring. >> once you get kids involved in creating games, they are learning s.t.e.m., but they're also learning a lot of other 21st-century skills, like leadership and teamwork, and they're getting critical thinking and all these other things that come along with it in that package. >> it's a team effort. students start by brainstorming concepts that would make a good game. >> and part of the process is that they have to come up with a design document first, where they basically map out the whole idea for the game and they have to come up with a story line and all that. >> these kids are learning basic engineering. every st
something 70% full timers 20 years ago to now 70% part-timers. they are also using new technology that sets employee hours by tracking the ebb and flow of customer traffic. >> technology destroys jobs. >> reporter: for people like karen, part time is enough time for now. >> hoping this will be the start of the next big thing for me. >> reporter: so the jobs market is gaining momentum but many of those out there are paying less and less. meanwhile, the paragon outlet mall in livermore is in the process of hiring more than 2,000 part time and full-time workers. in livermore, elissa harrington, cbs 5. >> a new poll shows a dramatic shift in the way californians think about the death penalty. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee on how they may be ready to end capital punishment here. grace. >> reporter: records the field poll has been asking this questions for six decades typically they would vote no supporting the death penalty. right now at this time in fact cycle most people vote no if they're undecided. that's not what we're seeing in this poll. it surprised a lot of people including the fie
. energy falling 1.7%. and technology down 1.5%5% falling commodity prices weighed on some of their respective stock sectors. oil fell more than two dollars per barrel, settling at its lowest price since june. the u.s. dollar was higher on the back of the emoyment numbers and a more expensive dollar can put downward presre on oil. esl giant chevron also hurt the energy sector and the dow. chevron had the biggesten percentage loss among dow stocks. chevron did not make as much money has anticipated in the third quarter. earnings per share were well short of eimates. similar to exxoimmobil, chevron also saw its production an cfuel sales fall, hit by hurricane isaac in august, legal troubles in brazil and a refinery fire in california. shares fell 2.8%closing atg their lowest price since july. two bright spots for chevron were its smaller refineries processing cheaper oil from montana and north dakota. meantime, chesapeake energy fell to a three month low, down 7.9%. the company has been trying to reduce its massive debt load. today the company said it may delay cutting its i.
and our technology companies, that we want to embrace technology as a way to announce this. so with that i am going to do the first tweet. tweeting. the new hash tag we would like everybody in the bay area to also utilize in their effort to go viral on this. there it goes. hopefully it goes on there. the hash tag sf super bowl! [applause] >> this is one example. facebook, google plus, instagram. we have all these wires in having people talk to us. what would they want and establish it, what kind of events that will help us be even more philanthropic about this. san francisco, santa clara, san jose, we want that effort to insight people to take this opportunity to join our nfl, join our 49ers, to join all of our sports crazy efforts and education efforts and all the things that we really reflect success in the san francisco bay area to join us in promoting this event and making sure that when we are ready to submit our bid to the nfl in may of next year that we will have created a community-based bay area wide effort to reflect on this wonderful opportunity. right now it is only an invitati
of the vehicle. there are a lot of things we do in technology to ensure the vehicles can't be stolen if they are broken into. but i really do see that members of these communities also see some of the benefits that these cars bring to them. they kind of watch out. it's almost like the neighborhood watch thing. this car is here, it's serving a purpose. i'm a member, i use it day to day. the car has really become part of the neighborhood. >> um-hm, okay. thank you very much. >>> sure. >>> i did want to say i'm looking at the material. thank you for putting this together. it looks like there are five u.s. cities, three canadian cities, and i think it's brilliant, this model of one-way vehicle * . i was going to ask about your vehicle fleet. it looks like you have globally 5,000 vehicles, 625 are electric. i'm just wondering do you use the smart cars or what kind of vehicles do you use? and i also see that san francisco, based on your market research, is almost like a perfect city to operate in given the density and many, many people that don't have cars. but i'm just wondering if you co
the mobile phone, only two technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. note elegies ever spread as rapidly. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and arguably before that it was fire so we know what mobile telephony means and smartphones and all that, but what does it mean for the majority of the worlds population? it's the communication highway. we dealt highways, communications highways into connecting people never connected before. in afghanistan attack about the story. you asked me about entrepreneurs who was responsible for creating the afghan cell phone can any. this is maybe the biggest story not invest in the last 10 years and we don't hear about it. why? because the fact that more afghans today have access to mobile telephony and know how to read or write, were a decade ago that would affect about 700 miles to make a phone call. but that's not a story. it is a story. it's a big story. for an ordinary afghan incentive and means a lot in terms of capabilities. but what is more exciting you think when you built the railroad, there's a lot of movies made. what
research in medical breakthroughs or new technology. we think america is stronger when we can count on affordable health care and medicare and social security, where there are rules to protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury poisoning. we think the market works better when consumers are protected from unscrupulous practices in the credit-card industry or from mortgage lenders and we believe that no politician in washington should control health care choices that women can make for themselves. [cheers and applause] now for eight year, we had a president who shared our beliefs and his name was bill clinton. his economic plan asked the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we could reduce our deficit and invest in our future. at the time, the republican congress and a senate candidate by the name of mitt romney said this would hurt the economy and kill jobs. it turns out that his judgment was just as bad back then as it is today. by the end of president clinton's second term, america created 23 million new jobs and incomes were up and poverty was down and we had the bigg
better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. >>> our second story "outfront," four days before the election, new cnn poll in what probably is going to be the most crucial swing state of all. we say probably. most people say definitely. 50 to 47% with the president ahead. within the margin of error. john king is in cincinnati tonight. john, another poll neck and neck, probably be a very long night on election night. what stood out in that poll to you? >> it is remarkable. if you look deep into the poll, the president might have a slight advantage, but this is a classic swing state and we have a dead heat. the president's getting the democrats. governor romney's getting the republicans so you want to
. sector analysis is particularly important technology. people confuse this gigantic group of stocks which comprises more than 15% of the s & p 500 constantly. tech is a whole group of markets. infrastructure stocks, assemblers, each have a separate growth rate. here i like to look at the earnings per share growth rate of the companies i follow versus the individual prices of the sector. the sector growth rate doesn't work even though people keep trying to use it. cloud stocks, for example, are highly valued. price rates to growth earnings are extreme. that means there's no room for error, a chink that could upset the growth rate. in 2011 one of my favorite cloud stocks -- it got pancaked and stayed ugly for a long time. why? because it underperformed its portion of the technology sector even as its growth rate would have been outstanding for say a personal computer-related stock or a disc drive, a semiconductor or cell phone company. these days knowing what the sector is isn't enough. you need to know the subsector. you need to know how your company stacks up against the growth rate of th
-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations arsafe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >> we have a good plan, and, great job. >> back in the katrina days and today you hear nothing but good thing about fema. >> president barack obama: i want to thank craig fugate, who lives and breathes this stuff. [applause]. >> neil: you know, i'm hearing all of this glad-handing and back slapping and i have a lot of friends, obviously, family in the metropolitan area around new york, a lot of friends, close ones in staten island and i knew what was going on and i want you to juxtapose these guys high-fiving each other and this. >> fed up! fed up! this line, that line, what are we? is this america? >> no food. >> people trapped here, still. >> don't have anything, anywhere to go. no clothes. >> people are hurting and still looking for people. it is crazy. >> nothing is done here. >> where will you go? you got no gas, nothing. >> 22 years in my home and i lost it. >> neil: who will you believe, officials who say everything is hunky-dor
systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new completely re-imagined 2013 chevrolet malibu. sleek new styling... sophisticated dual cockpit design, and sport sculpted seats. available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu. ♪ refined comfort to get you in a malibu state of mind no matter what state you live in. ♪ >>> we're awaiting president obama in a swing state of ohio. meantime, in another swing state, that of virginia, bill clinton campaigning on behalf of the president. let's listen in at chesapeake, virginia, at indiana river high school. [ applause ] >> i don't know about you, but i'd rather you save the gasoline and export the oil if that's what we need to do. and that's why governor romney is having such a hard time breaking through in ohio. so what did he do? he ran -- he put -- he put a bogus ad on saying that for president had allowed j
'm p. making real things... for real. ...that make a real difference. ♪ we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. >>> and let's take a closer look right now in the race to 270 electoral votes. john king is here at the magic wall. on this day with three days to go, it's going to be complicate d. >> we know it's close and we have to say advantage to the president. but how big, that's the open question. we start the final weekend 237 strong or leaning the president's way. 206 leaning governor romney's way. the race of course is to 270. the president is ending withal rallies in iowa, wisconsin and ohio. why? because that's his eas
images. >> you know, this is modern technology meets mother nature. we have people capturing this, we just got a message, hoping that everybody is safe, sound, a lot of people are still suffering. our reporters went out through stricken areas, documenting who life is like. >> this is a line for gas, and it started way, way back there. this is absurd, oh, my god, i'm not getting gas, there is no way i'm getting gas. >> we are walking the 59th bridge in new york city back from work. we have had about a three mile walk both ways. but it is just what new yorkers do. we're coming from queens, going back to our home in long island. we're not the only ones, every which way you look, everybody is doing their own thing. >> there is no traffic cops, not good, not good. >> this is what is in front of our building, that is my building in the back. this went all the way through the building. there is no fences left. >> i'm a train operator, i'm supposed to report here. and it is a ghost town. this is cone island station. normally it is hustle, bustle here, nothing but muck on the street level. >>
guess since those days there has been one important improvement, one technological improvement, that we use expensively to create interoperatability and that is ip networks built of sdparate systems and the network allows us to operate. as you see from our demonstration as you checked in this morning, as you ridge stered this morning, san francisco talking it oakland, talking to this ship, talking over cellular, talking across and with different networks. the challenge for interoperatability is beginning to be met, i would say, the challenge for interoperatability at the same time is about to get much greater. we as a nation are about to embark on the most ambitous, most challenging communications endeavor that we have ever attempted, which is the creating of purse net, the public safety broad band or 4g network. and with that brings the promise of new challenges for sure in interoperatability and new capabilities that we have never had before. in fact, no other country is as far along as we are, even though we're just starting. what we see is the opportunity there to interoperate i
of radio frequencies, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and sheriff's department were also there able to provide u
leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that's not a political statement, that is a factual statement. anyone who says that there's not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. >>> there may be denial over what caused hurricane sandy, but no denying its effect. absolute devastation. the storm surge that battered the jersey shore in lower manhattan was dramatic, but climate scientists say, get ready. there are more sandys sure to come. >>> what is also sure to come is more bitter fighting over climate change. mitt romney drew a laugh at the national convention in august when he said this. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans, and heal the planet. >> former president bill clinton hit back at those comments this week. >> he ridiculed the president, ridiculed the president for his efforts to fight global warming and economically benphyllo phye ways. he said, oh, you're going to turn
, working with our department of technology and our city administrator. but ultimately working with our department of public works and mohammed at the helm, making sure this got done on time within budget, having the architects and engineers under [speaker not understood] working with the expert laboratory folks from dph and the hiv clinic to make sure that we did it right. because the laboratories have to meet federal standards. but i think also a great kudos has to happen to our partners, both locally, regionally, and the federal government. we could not have done this without the 9-1/2 million dollars of recovery monies that we got through the federal government. we have herb schultz here from the department of human services federal government. they've been really at the forefront with us. certainly dan bernel representing leader pelosi. she has been really a stalwart fighter. when everybody was cutting funds, she preserved that money for us. and, of course, i've got to put out a big, big thanks to president obama because without that recovery money, we wouldn't be here talking abou
of globalization changes in technology that have advantaged the educated of those with high skills at the expense of the uneducated. and there clearly there is some truth to this story that education matters more on determining economic rewards. but the more we looked at this, the less satisfied we were that explanation. that it couldn't explain why the economic gains were so concentr ed within a very small subset of the educated people in american society. i mean 29% of americans now have college degrees but much, much smaller percentage of amerans were benefiting from this economic transformation. >> well as we speak i can hear all of those free-marketers out they say "come on, piers -- come on hacker, it is the global economy. it's the cheap labor overseas. it's those high-technology skills that you say are required, these deep forces that actually are beyond our control, d are making inevitable this division between the top and everyone else," right? that's what they were saying as they listen to you right now. >> we think the story that's told about how the global economy has shifted clearly
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